University Continues Solar Energy Push Through Proposed Project

Cornell announced a proposal to build a 10-acre solar farm on University-owned property in Seneca, New York...

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By Annie Bui, via the Cornell Daily Sun, 11/07/14

Pictured above is the Snyder Road Solar Farm, Cornell’s first large-scale solar initiative. (Ryan Landvater / Sun Senior Photographer)
Pictured above is the Snyder Road Solar Farm, Cornell’s first large-scale solar initiative. (Ryan Landvater / Sun Senior Photographer)

Further demonstrating its commitment to a sustainable future, Cornell announced a proposal to build a 10-acre solar farm on University-owned property in Seneca, New York, Thursday.

The announcement comes on the heels of the completion of Cornell’s first large-scale solar energy project — Snyder Road Solar Farm — which went live in September.

The proposed two-megawatt solar farm, which is still pending approval from the town of Seneca, will offset “nearly 40 percent” of the annual demand generated by the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station in Geneva, according to a University press release.

The solar photovoltaic panel array will use the New York State Electric and Gas’ remote net metering program, which will allow the University to “receive credit for the electricity the project adds to the grid,” according to the release. This will then allow Cornell to offset consumption at its other locations.

Thomas Burr, associate dean for the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences and director of the Geneva experiment station, said the proposed solar farm would be similar in scale to the Snyder Road Solar Farm, which is located near the Ithaca Tompkins Regional Airport.

Burr went on to explain the impact that the University’s second large-scale solar project will have on the Geneva campus.

“The solar farm at NYSAES will generate a very significant portion of the station’s electrical need, while reducing our overall carbon footprint,” he said.

He added that he and his colleagues were “pleased to be an integral part of Cornell’s emphasis on solar energy.”

“Such initiatives demonstrate clearly how committed the University is to sustainability through employment of diverse technologies,” he said.

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