Neighborhood Food Hubs in Tompkins County

Have extra produce from your garden or CSA share? Donate it!

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This summer, gardeners throughout Tompkins County will have a convenient way to donate their extra vegetables, fruit and eggs, by dropping them at nine Neighborhood Food Hubs in Danby, Dryden, Groton, and Ithaca.

How Hubs Work
Neighborhood Food Hubs make donating garden produce easy! A volunteer Hub Holder hosts a cooler on their front porch one day a week, which will serve as the drop-off location for produce. The donations are distributed to food pantries, local meal programs, and individuals. Gardeners donated more than 700 pounds of produce during the 2013 pilot season of Neighborhood Food Hubs.

The 2014 season will run from July 1 – October 1. For more information, visit:
friendshipdonations.org/hubs.

2014 Neighborhood Food Hub locations and schedule:

Danby
Wednesdays, 8am-8pm, starting July 2: 222 Bald Hill Rd.

Dryden
Tuesdays, 8am-8pm, starting July 1: 33 James St.

Groton
Tuesdays, 10am-9pm, starting July 1: Groton Public Library, 112 E. Cortland St.

Ithaca

  • Mondays, 8am-5pm, starting July 7: Plant Science Building, Cornell University
  • Tuesdays, 8am-8pm, starting July 1: 222 E. Falls St.
  • Wednesdays and Sundays, 8am-8pm, starting July 6: Ithaca Community Gardens
  • Fridays, 10am-8pm, starting July 11: Southside Community Center, 305 S. Plain St.
  • Saturdays, 8am-8pm, starting July 5: 411 N. Cayuga St.
  • Saturdays, 8am-8pm, starting July 5: Cornell Garden Plots, Freese Rd.

Purpose of Neighborhood Food Hubs

  • Help home gardeners donate their extra garden bounty.
  • Connect neighbors and communities to fresh, healthy, hyper-local food.
  • Reduce waste.

How Hubs Help

  • Improve community access to fresh food.
  • Raise awareness about the impact of homegrown food.
  • Rescue lovingly grown food from an untimely end at the compost heap.

About Friendship Donations Network

Founded in 1988 by Sara Pines, MSW, Ph.D., Friendship Donations Network’s mission is to rescue fresh nutritious food from stores and farms that would otherwise be thrown away and redistribute it to neighbors in need. This is accomplished by an extensive network of volunteers who pick up donations of mostly perishable excess and day-old food and deliver them to pantries and programs that serve in excess of 2,100 people weekly.

Views expressed in News posts may not be those of Cornell University. No endorsement is implied.