Cornell Among Recipients of State Awards for Energy Storage Technology

Cornell among six recipients getting $1.4 million from NY state to create new technologies in battery and energy storage...

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White Room preparations at the Cornell NanoScale Facility (CNF) in Duffield Hall (University Photography/Jason Koski)
White Room preparations at the Cornell NanoScale Facility (CNF) in Duffield Hall (University Photography/Jason Koski)

By Staff via the Ithaca Journal, 03/05/14

Cornell University is among the six recipients getting a total of $1.4 million from New York state to create new technologies in battery and energy storage that could one day harden the state’s electric grid and diversify transportation fuels.

“Investing in New York’s cleantech economy will revolutionize the way we store and transfer energy while creating jobs and supporting our state’s clean energy businesses,” Governor Andrew M. Cuomo said in a statement. “This funding will help to create new opportunities for manufacturers and researchers around the state to commercialize their products, help the environment by reducing energy use, and ultimately continue to grow our state’s green economy.”

The majority of recipients were awarded $250,000. Cornell will work to develop and demonstrate a regenerative fuel cell energy storage system, using a membrane designed at the university to produce hydrogen. The project could reduce the cost of hydrogen production and pave the way for hydrogen-powered vehicles.

Also, Widetronix will work with the Cornell Nanoscale Facility to enhance the powerdensity of the Widetronix betavoltaic platform.

Other recipients include Custom Electronics in the Mohawk Valley, which will work with Binghamton University to develop a new electric capacitor for power conditioning applications to enable a smoother, consistent voltage for sensitive electronic devices; Columbia University seeks to scale-up electrochemical reactor technology developed at the school using a system that converts electricity into energy stored in a liquid fuel; Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy will work with Finch Paper of Glens Falls and JNC of Rye to develop high-energy density cathode materials for lithium-sulfur batteries using a low-cost byproduct generated by the paper industry; Con Edison and the Battery and Energy Storage Testing and Commercialization Center of Rochester will work with Ambri Inc. to develop and test a working prototype of Ambri’s Liquid Metal Battery for grid-scale electricity storage applications.

Funding is provided through the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority and New York Battery and Energy Storage Technology Consortium Bench-to-Prototype solicitation.

Views expressed in News posts may not be those of Cornell University. No endorsement is implied.